Tag - transcreation

13
Jan

Is your website right for the English-speaking market?

Steps to ensure your success across borders. Your website is your brand’s best international representative. It can reach consumers from any country at any time, and can help you close sales in markets you didn’t even know you had. But in order to maximise its benefits, you have to make sure your website is internationally …

10
Oct

Transcreating IKEA

Localisation challenges and successes of going global. IKEA seems to have cracked the code to global marketing. With 313 stores spanning 38 countries and €34.2 billion in sales in 2016, IKEA has become the world’s furniture giant. But the process has not been easy. IKEA has struggled to localise its brand and product offerings, continually …

17
Jul

Doing business across cultures

5 critical differences you need to know. The world is the entrepreneur’s oyster. Doing business across borders is easier than ever before and businesses are rushing to take advantage of new international opportunities. While business continues to integrate, however, science has shown that business culture is not merging in the same way. Culturally-based business practices …

8
Jun

Marketing in colour across cultures

Colour is integral to your brand’s image and identity. Science has repeatedly shown that colour is one of the most important ways a brand communicates with its customers, and that the right colour choices can increase sales and significantly improve brand recognition. However, just because your colours hit the mark in your home market doesn’t …

4
Apr

Is transcreation right for your company?

Five key differences between translation and transcreation. The new field of transcreation is taking over the cross-cultural marketing game. It has enabled companies to successfully expand in ways that were not possible decades ago. But transcreation can be a time and resource-intensive process, so how do you know if and when it’s really necessary for …

13
Mar

Cultural marketing mistakes

Seven costly mishaps by the world’s largest corporations. We’ve all had this experience: we venture outside our cultural bubble, and suddenly we’re not the exceptional communicators we thought we were. We tell a joke that falls flat. We make references we thought were universal. We use body language that baffles those around us. We tend to believe …